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Indiana State Police (IN)


Contents

Regions

ISP Region Map.jpg

*As of 7/05/2011 Region 5 is dispatching for D51 full time*

Districts

ISP District Map.jpg

Indiana State Police Codes and Signals

10 Codes

State Police 10 Codes as a Microsoft Word file

  • 10-0 Fatality
  • 10-1 Unable To Copy
  • 10-2 Signals Good
  • 10-3 Stop Transmitting
  • 10-4 Acknowledgment/Status OK
  • 10-5 Relay
  • 10-6 Busy, Stand By Unless Urgent
  • 10-7 Out-Of-Service
  • 10-8 In Service
  • 10-9 Repeat
  • 10-10 Fight In Progress
  • 10-11 Dog Case
  • 10-12 Stand By
  • 10-13 Weather And Road Report
  • 10-14 Report Of Prowler
  • 10-15 Civil Disturbance
  • 10-16 Domestic Trouble
  • 10-17 Complainant
  • 10-18 Urgent
  • 10-19 Go to Station
  • 10-20 Location
  • 10-21 Call
  • 10-22 Disregard
  • 10-23 Arrived At Scene
  • 10-24 Assignment Completed
  • 10-25 Report to/Meet
  • 10-26 Detaining Subject
  • 10-27 Drivers License Information
  • 10-28 Vehicle Registration Info.
  • 10-29 Check Records For Wanted
  • 10-30 Illegal Use Of Radio
  • 10-31 Crime In Progress
  • 10-32 Gun
  • 10-33 Emergency - Stand By
  • 10-34 Riot
  • 10-35 Major Crime Alert
  • 10-36 Correct Time
  • 10-37 Investigate Suspicious Vehicle
  • 10-38 Stopping Suspicious Vehicle
  • 10-39 Urgent-Use Lights And Siren
  • 10-40 Silent Run-No Lights Or Siren
  • 10-41 Start of Shift
  • 10-42 End of Shift
  • 10-43 Information
  • 10-44 Request Permission To Leave Patrol For____________
  • 10-45 Animal Carcass In Road
  • 10-46 Assist Motorist
  • 10-47 Emergency Road Repair
  • 10-48 Traffic Control
  • 10-49 Traffic Signal Out
  • 10-50 Accident F, PI, PD (F-Fatal, PI-Person Injured, PD-Property Damage)
  • 10-51 Wrecker Needed
  • 10-52 Ambulance needed
  • 10-53 Road Blocked
  • 10-54 Livestock on Roadway
  • 10-55 Intoxicated Driver
  • 10-56 Intoxicated Pedestrian
  • 10-57 Hit & Run Accident
  • 10-58 Direct Traffic
  • 10-59 Convoy Or Escort
  • 10-60 Squad in Vicinity
  • 10-61 Personnel in Vicinity
  • 10-62 Reply To Message
  • 10-63 Prepare To Make Written Copy
  • 10-64 Local Message
  • 10-65 Net Message
  • 10-66 Message Cancellation
  • 10-67 Clear for Net Message
  • 10-68 Dispatch Information
  • 10-69 Message Received
  • 10-70 Fire Alarm
  • 10-71 Advise Nature of Fire
  • 10-72 Report Alarm Progress
  • 10-73 Smoke Report
  • 10-74 Negative
  • 10-75 In Contact With
  • 10-76 En Route
  • 10-77 ETA (estimated time of arrival)
  • 10-78 Need Assistance
  • 10-79 Notify Coroner
  • 10-80 Alarm
  • 10-81 Breathalyzer Report
  • 10-82 Reserve Lodging
  • 10-83 School Crossing Detail
  • 10-84 E.T.A.
  • 10-85 Arrival Delayed
  • 10-86 Operator on Duty
  • 10-87 Pick Up
  • 10-88 Advise Telephone Number Of:
  • 10-89 Bomb Threat
  • 10-90 Bank Alarm
  • 10-91 Pick up Subject
  • 10-92 Illegally Parked Vehicle
  • 10-93 Blockade
  • 10-94 Drag Racing
  • 10-95 Subject in Custody
  • 10-96 Mental Subject
  • 10-97 Test Signal
  • 10-98 Prison Or Jail Break
  • 10-99 Records Indicated Wanted

Signals

  • 1 Call Officer
  • 2 Call HQ
  • 3 Call Control
  • 4 Report to HQ
  • 5 Go to Control
  • 6 Call - Person, at Number
  • 7 Emergency
  • 8 Meet __
  • 9 Disregard
  • 10 Rush
  • 11 Confidential Information
  • 12 Reply by Phone
  • 13 Army Convoy
  • 14 Plain Clothes / Unmarked
  • 15 Cannot Comment on Air
  • 16 Aircraft Accident
  • 17 Give Emergency Right of Way
  • 18 Target Practice
  • 19 Truck Check
  • 20 Car Wash
  • 21 Car Lube
  • 22 Car Repair
  • 23 Speeding Vehicle
  • 24 Vehicle & Occupants Detained
  • 25 Regular Post Meeting
  • 26 Bringing Subjects to Court
  • 27 Traffic Stop
  • 28 Bank Detail
  • 29 Post Meeting
  • 30 Special Patrol Assignment
  • 31 Traffic Congestion
  • 32 Check all Records for this Subject
  • 33 Know Burglar
  • 34 Possible Mental Case
  • 35 Post Inspection
  • 36 Advise Work Schedule
  • 37 Any Messages?
  • 38 No Messages
  • 39 Post Inspection
  • 40 Subject/Item is Wanted
  • 41 Is Lie Detector Available?
  • 42 Is Breathalyzer Available?
  • 43J1 Have Personnel
  • 43J2 Have Property in Possession
  • 43J3 Have Prisoner in Custody
  • 43J4 Have Papers
  • 44 Advise Traffic Conditions
  • 45 Broadcast FCC Call Sign
  • 46 Pursuit in Progress
  • 47 Escort
  • 48 Visitors Present?
  • 49 Platoon Standby Alert
  • 50 Activate Riot Control Platoon
  • 51 Running Radar in Area
  • 52 HAZMAT Incident
  • 54 Overtime
  • 55 Activity Report
  • 60 Drugs
  • 61 Homicide
  • 66 Requested Service Unavailable
  • 70 Sex Crime
  • 80 Not on File/Not Wanted
  • 88 Microphone keyed and no voice
  • 89 Accidentally keyed the microphone
  • 100 Emergency - Urgent Traffic Only

ISP District/Unit Numbers

  • Area 1 Units (D13,14,16)
  • Area 2 Units (D21,22,24)
  • Area 3 Units (D33,34,35,53)
  • Area 4 Units (D42,45)
  • Area 5 Units (D51,52)
  • Car 1 - ISP Supt..
  • Car 2-6 - ISP Deputy Supt's.
  • Car 7 and on - Majors
  • X - Headquarters Units

Area cars start with the area number. IE: 1-80 would be the Area 1 investigations Captain.

  • 13 Lowell
  • 14 Lafayette
  • 16 Peru
  • 18 Communications Division Personnel
  • 19 FBI
  • 21 Toll Road
  • 22 Fort Wayne
  • 24 Bremen
  • 33 Bloomington
  • 34 Jasper
  • 35 Evansville
  • 42 Versailles
  • 45 Sellersburg
  • 50 US Fish & Wildlife (50-38 @ Muscatatuck reports to ISP D42 and to DNR SR as Five-Zero-Three-Eight)
  • 51 Pendleton
  • 52 Indianapolis
  • 53 Putnamville
  • 56 Alcohol Beverage Excise Police
  • 58 Maintenance and Quartermaster
  • 65 HPV Units (Mustangs)
  • 66 Public Information Officer
  • 75 Integrated Public Safety Commission (SAFE-T Admins/Techs)
  • 76 State Capitol Police
  • 83 Hoosier Helpers Indianapolis
  • 84 Hoosier Helpers NW Indiana (ISP Mechanics in Versailles district)
  • 85 Hoosier Helpers Southern Indiana (Chaplains in some districts)
  • 88 ERT Units
  • 89 CSI/Lab Personnel
  • 91
  • 92 Special Investigations
  • 93 Investigators
  • 95 Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Division (3 digits are Motor Carrier Inspectors, 1&2 digits are Troopers assigned to CVED)
  • 96 Drug Enforcement Division
  • 97 State Fire Arson Investigators
  • K K9 Units
  • MP Motorcycle Patrol
  • MS Meth Suppression Units
Unit Numbers
  • 01 District Commander (Lieutenant)
  • 02 District First Sergeant
  • 03-06 Squad Sergeants
  • 07-10 Squad Sergeants or Corporals (varies by District)
  • 11-79 Road Troopers
  • 80 District Investigative Coordinator (First Sergeant)
  • 81-89 Criminal Investigators (Troopers and Sergeants)
  • 90's Varies by District

ISP District County Assignments

Lowell (13) -

Units in the 100-600 series denote zones 1 through 6:

  • Zone 1 - Northern Lake Co. North of US-30 and West of Portage
  • Zone 2 - Porter / Laporte Co North of US-6
  • Zone 3 - Southern Lake Co South of US-30 and East of Portage
  • Zone 4 - Porter / Laporte Co South of US-6
  • Zone 5 - Newton / Jasper Co
  • Zone 6 - Starke / Pulaski Co


Lafayette (14)


Peru (16) -
  • 10's - Fulton
  • 20's - Wabash
  • 30's - Cass
  • 40's - Howard
  • 50's - Miami
  • 60's - Tipton
  • 70's - Grant


Toll Road (21)


Fort Wayne (22) -
  • 22-teen's - Zone 1, LaGrange / Noble
  • 22-20's - Zone 2, Steuben / Dekalb
  • 22-30's - Zone 3, Huntington / Whitley
  • 22-40's - Zone 4, Allen
  • 22-50's - Zone 5, Adams / Wells / Blackford / Jay


Bremen (24) -
  • 10's - Elkhart County
  • 20's - St. Joseph County
  • 40's - Marshall County
  • 50's - Kosciusko County


Bloomington (33)


Jasper (34)


Evansville (35) -
  • 10's - Knox
  • 20's - Posey
  • 30's - Vanderburgh
  • 40's - Gibson
  • 50's - Warrick
  • 60's - Pike


Versailles (42) (Now includes old D43 area) -
  • 10's - Jefferson
  • 20's - Dearborn, Ohio, Switzerland
  • 30's - Jackson
  • 40's - Decatur, Franklin
  • 50's - Dearborn, Ripley
  • 60's - Bartholomew
  • 70's - Jennings
  • 90's - Old 43-8x units


Sellersburg (45)
  • 10's - Clark/Floyd
  • 20's - Clark/Floyd
  • 30's - Harrison
  • 40's - Scott
  • 50's - Washington


Pendleton (51)
  • 10's - Delaware
  • 20's - Madison
  • 30's - Randolph
  • 40's - Henry
  • 50's - Rush, Fayette
  • 60's - DUI Task Force
  • 70's - Wayne


Indianapolis (52)


Putnamville (53)
  • 10's - Clay County
  • 20's - Parke/Vermillion Counties
  • 30's - Putnam County
  • 40's - Vigo County
  • 50's - Vigo County
  • 60's - Sullivan County

SAFE-T Mutual Aid Areas

This list contains old ISP district numbers. While extinct, the regional MA talkgroups still conform to these old district boundaries.

SAFE-T Mutual Aid Map
  • Region A District 13 (Lowell Area) - Counties: Lake/Porter/Laporte/Newton/Jasper/Starke/Pulaski

  • Region B District 24 (Bremen Area) - Counties: St. Joseph/Elkhart/Marshall/Kosciusko

  • Region C District 22 (Fort Wayne) - Counties: Lagrange/Steuben/Noble/Dekalb/Whitley/Allen/Huntington/Wells/Adams

  • Region D District 14 (Lafayette) - Counties: Benton/White/Carroll/Warren/Tippecanoe/Clinton/Fountain/Montgomery

  • Region E District 16 (Peru) - Counties: Fulton/Cass/Miami/Wabash/Howard/Tipton

  • Region F District 25 (Redkey) - Counties: Grant/Blackford/Jay/Delaware/Randolph

  • Region G District 51 (Pendleton) - Counties: Hamilton/Madison/Hancock

  • Region H District 54 (Terre Haute) - Counties: Clay/Sullivan/Parke/Vermillion/Vigo

  • Region I District 53 (Putnamville) - Counties: Putnam/Hendricks/Morgan/

  • Region J District 52 (Indianapolis) - Counties: Boone/Hendricks/Marion/Johnson/Shelby

  • Region K District 41 (Connersville) - Counties: Henry/Rush/Wayne/Fayette/Union/Franklin

  • Region L District 33 (Bloomington) - Counties: Owen/Greene/Monroe/Morgan/Brown/Lawrence

  • Region N District 42 (Versailles) - Counties: Decatur/Ripley/Dearborn/Ohio/Jefferson/Switzerland

  • Region M District 43 (Seymour) - Counties: Jackson/Bartholomew/Jennings

  • Region O District 35 (Evansville) - Counties: Knox/Gibson/Pike/Posey/Vanderburgh/Warrick

  • Region P District 34 (Jasper) - Counties: Daviess/Martin/Orange/Dubois/Crawford/Perry/Spencer

  • Region Q District 45 (Sellerburg) - Counties: Washington/Scott/Clark/Floyd/Harrison


A Brief History Of ISP Communications

While gangsters such as John Dillinger plagued the country back in the late 1920’s and early ‘30’s, their exploits did prompt some “progress” in Indiana State Police communications. Even though Dillinger had been killed by the FBI in July of 1934, Indiana still ranked fourth in the nation in bank robberies. That same year the Indiana Banker’s Association and the Governor’s Contingency Fund set out to raise money to create a statewide short wave radio network. The goal was for this network to develop a communications link between law enforcement agencies. The pursuit of Dillinger and other criminals was greatly hampered by the lack of an effective statewide communications system.

The original method of communication between trooper and district headquarters amounted to the trooper having regular stops on his patrol route where he called in by telephone at designated intervals to receive dispatch information. Fortunately, by the end of 1934 nearly $50,000 in necessary funding had been raised to implement the new communications system. In 1935, five Western Electric AM transmitters were put in place in Indianapolis, Columbia City, the Culver Military Academy, Seymour, and Jasper. The first message was sent out on May 6, 1935 reporting a stolen vehicle in Ligonier. These new stations were given call letters similar to what radio stations use today. While this new system was a vast improvement over the previous method, this system was still a one-way communications system. The trooper could only “receive” dispatches; he couldn’t respond back via radio to confirm receipt of the message. The dispatches were communicated three times to ensure a trooper received the message. The trooper would then have to find a telephone and call in to confirm he had received the dispatch and was able to get further details if necessary.

In 1937 a Continuous Wave (CW) network using Morse Code for communications between state and local law enforcement was in place. A good CW operator could send and receive anywhere from 40 to 50 words per minute. This helped relieve some of the load on voice transmissions. Unfortunately, skilled CW operators were hard to find. Despite the lack of skilled CW operators, the CW system soon provided an effective communications link between not only ISP and local law enforcement; it provided an interstate law enforcement communications link as well. Because CW transmissions were monitored by numerous stations simultaneously, information could be disseminated more quickly and with less expense than making numerous telephone calls.

It was around World War II when the Indiana State Police began installing two way radios in its patrol cars so troopers were able to respond to radio dispatches directly from their cars. Also, by 1947 the Amplitude Modulation (AM) radios in use at the time became obsolete and ISP replaced those radios with a more reliable system known as Frequency Modulation (FM). The “new” FM system was a “noise free” transmission system while the AM system was not.

In February of 1957 the Indiana State Police implemented the microwave system of communication. The microwave system provided rapid, reliable, multichannel communication. Originally the installation linked General Headquarters in Indianapolis with the Pendleton Post. By the end of 1960 all Indiana State Police districts and General Headquarters were linked together by the microwave system providing both telephone and teletype communication.

Shortly thereafter CW stations began to fade away as new communications networks were being established nationwide using telephone circuits as transmission media. Included among these “new” networks was the National Law Enforcement Telecommunications System (NLETS). The Indiana State Police became affiliated with this network in 1966 which increased the speed of handling messages at a rate of over 100 words per minute. In addition, the new system left less of a chance for error than the CW system.

In 1968 the National Crime Information Center (NCIC) was developed. A computer located in Washington, D.C. served as a central repository to store information on wanted persons and stolen vehicles from law enforcement agencies all over the country. This new technology enabled law enforcement agencies nationwide to enter wanted persons or stolen vehicles into the database, thus increasing the chances of apprehension even if the suspect traveled out-of-state.

In 1977 engineers from the Indiana State Police Communications Division developed a portable radio repeater system. In addition to this new communications technology, they developed a mutual aid communications system known as the Indiana Law Enforcement Emergency Network (ILEEN). Now for the first time there was a system in place where troopers could have direct radio communication with officers from local police and sheriff departments. Not only did this system enhance the effectiveness of inter-department communications, it provided the public with more efficient law enforcement service and improved officer safety.

This communication system stayed in place for many years without any great advances in communication technology. Then in 1990 the Indiana State Police began testing an 800 MHz radio system which provided a much clearer, more efficient, and more advanced means of communication. The Lafayette District was selected as a testing district for the new system. By the end of April, 1992 Indianapolis, Pendleton, Terre Haute, and Putnamville Districts were also brought on line with the 800 MHz system. While those five districts were able to communicate via 800 MHz it was still necessary for those districts and their troopers to continue to monitor the low band frequencies to ensure communications between troopers and districts not yet equipped with the 800 MHz system.

In 1999 the Indiana General Assembly created the Integrated Public Safety Commission (IPSC) to coordinate voice and data communications as well as other multi-agency public safety issues. In 2000 a project known as Hoosier Safe-T (Safety Acting for Everyone Together) came to the forefront as a result of the creation of the IPSC. While this system was in the developmental stages in the late 1990’s, the importance of such a communications system with interoperability between police, fire, EMS, public utilities, and other governmental agencies became ever greater after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. Work on the new system was given top priority and was phased in to each ISP district over the last several years with the last districts and enforcement personnel being upgraded to 800 MHz by March of 2007.

The 800 MHz system is now operational statewide and frequencies and talk groups are available to all law enforcement agencies, fire departments, EMS, local public utilities, as well as other governmental agencies. This system allows for direct communication between all agencies and their personnel in case of an emergency that requires multi-agency response. It also allows for multi-agency communication across state lines in case there is an incident or emergency occurring near a state line involving emergency responders from different states. It is because of the vision of the Indiana State Police back in the 1990’s that the state of Indiana is so advanced in statewide communication interoperability.

Over the last 75 years the Indiana State Police has come a long way from the trooper having to make stops along his patrol route to call the post for assignments. With the technology available today a trooper not only transmits and receives dispatch information via 800 MHz radio, information can even be transmitted and received between dispatch and a laptop computer installed in the trooper’s car. Keeping up with continued advances in communication technology makes the Indiana State Trooper more efficient but more importantly, they can provide better service to the public.

  • NOTE-The sources for portions of the above historical information:

Gangsters, Gunfire, and Political Intrigue: The History of the Indiana State Police by Marilyn Olsen Indiana State Police 1933-1983 by Esther Kellner

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